Albert Hung of Trinity Church added to Symposium Workshop Leaders


Lifestyles of the Rich and Faithful Postcard (front)-page-001

Pastor Albert Hung will be a discussion panelist and workshop leader at Symposium V, held on October 5th at Evergreen Baptist Church, San Gabriel Valley. Our morning session, focused on money matters, features members of the business and finance world, discussing how to lead healthy financial lives while also living out our faith. Pastor Albert, as the “lay person” of this group, will add his “wealth” of personal wisdom and insights from his Lifestyles of the Rich and Faithful sermon series. Other workshop leaders are: Shana Won,Jeffery Wong and Sal Mendoza.


Workshop Description: Money. Every day, we have to make choices about how we get it, spend it, invest it, or share it. And yet, few people feel confident about how they’re handling their finances. The stress associated with money can take a toll on our minds, hearts, and bodies as well as wreak havoc in our relationships. Studies reveal that fighting over money is the leading cause of divorce.

  • What can we do to make sure that we are in control of our finances rather than letting our finances control us?
  • How can we ensure we have enough money to cover all our family’s needs, save for the future, and still give generously towards the causes we care about?

The Bible is packed with wise counsel about finances. This highly practical workshop will help you:

  1. Understand what God says about money.
  2. Give you concrete action steps so you can become a better steward of the resources God has entrusted to you.
Speaker Bio:

Albert Hung is the Lead Pastor at Trinity Church of the Nazarene in Monterey Park, California, a multi-cultural church with services in English and Mandarin. After spending several years working in theater, television, and the music industry, Albert committed his life to Christ in 2000 while living in Taipei, Taiwan.

Soon afterwards, he moved to Southern California to begin a new journey as one called to full time ministry. He is passionate about leadership development, cross-cultural ministry, and mobilizing Christians to use their gifts and abilities to advance the kingdom of God in the local community.



ISAAC’s 5th Symposium: Healing of Memories, Healing of Finances will be held on October 5th at Evergreen Baptist Church, San Gabriel Valley. 



Register for Symposium V HERE.

2014 AAG CFP: Geography of Religions and Belief Systems

Justin Tse (谢坚恒) is a Ph.D. Candidate in Human Geography at the University of British Columbia at Vancouver (UBC).  His research interests revolve around geographies of religion in the Pacific region. 

His recent book reviews of “His Dominion” and the “Yellow Peril” are featured in SANACS Journal #4, available HERE.

Justin K.H. Tse (謝堅恆)

Please distribute widely.

Geography of Religions and Belief Systems (GORABS) Specialty Group
Call for Papers
AAG 2014: Tampa

The AAG’s Geography of Religions and Belief Systems (GORABS) Specialty Group invites papers and session to be submitted for sponsorship for the AAG’s Annual Meeting in Tampa, FL in 2014.

GORABS promotes the use of religion as a geographical analytic. Historically, the group has focused on how religion impresses a human impact on the environment and vice versa. Complementing these environmental approaches, more recent work in geographies of religion have revealed that religion is a productive lens through which to understand and debate secularization processes, the intersection of religion in social identity formation, the role of religion in cultural processes of placemaking, and issues of religion in political geography. Geographers of religion are contributing to current conversations and challenges in race, gender, sexuality, age, migration studies, critical geopolitics, global development studies, political…

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Sal Mendoza of City National to Present at Symposium

Photo Credit: CARAT NET

Photo Credit: CARAT NET

Sal Mendoza is the senior vice president of community reinvestment at City National Bank, supporting Community Reinvestment Act, loan development and marketing efforts, as well as City National’s community outreach initiatives and Hispanic new business development. In addition to a prolific banking career, Mr. Mendoza is a staple in the Los Angeles community, serving as chairman of the board of directors of the Los Angeles Neighborhood Housing Services, and as a member of the boards of directors of Public Counsel, People Assisting the Homeless, and the San Fernando Valley Financial Development Corporation.

Mr. Mendoza will address ways that the financial industry can bring about greater economic justice instead of merely perpetuating the cycle of “money makes money.”
ISAAC’s 5th Symposium: Healing of Memories, Healing of Finances will be held on October 5th at Evergreen Baptist Church, San Gabriel Valley. 
Register for Symposium V HERE.

Investment Manager, Jeffery Wong, to Present at Symposium

“The Finance Industry and the Kingdom: Points of Dissonance, Points of Resonance”

Jeff Wong's photoJeffrey Wong has over 25 years of experience in finance, trading, and investment management. He will be sharing from the expertise and insight he has garnered over that time, including thoughts on the challenges of integrating work in the financial sector within a kingdom framework, and practical ways we can be good stewards of our finances.

Specific topics include dealing with the idols that arise from working in a money-focused industry, working in a profession that seems to benefit a more narrow scope of people (in contrast with fields such as medicine and education with a wider reach of society), whether serving the kingdom takes place through or apart from work, living simply, and implementing a sound savings/investment plan.


ISAAC’s 5th Symposium: Healing of Memories, Healing of Finances will be held on October 5th at Evergreen Baptist Church, San Gabriel Valley. 
Registration Now Available HERE.

Shana Won, CFP, to Present at ISSAC’s 5th Symposium

Shana Won, Certified Financial Planner, has been in the business of helping her clients achieve their financial goals for over 20 years. At ISAAC’s 5th Symposium, Shana will be sharing her wisdom and practical tools during our “Healing of Finances” session.

Shana’s workshop will lead attendees through “Decoupling Emotional Ties to Your Money.” She’ll tackle the following questions:

  • How often have you been angry over money?
  • How often have you felt shamed by money?
  • How often have you felt so happy over money?
  • How often do you covet other’s good fortune?
  • Have you ever been paralyzed by fear of not having enough money?

Looking at the ways “money” can elicit many emotions influenced by one’s culture and personal history of own experiences, Shana answers the question of, “how can we avoid having these emotions control your relationship to money?”

In her words, “the challenge we face is redirecting our relationship with money. We want to learn to decouple our emotional attachment to money as an end and learn to value money as a tool to achieve greater value. The art of shepherding our fortune is to create value so that we can be a good steward of our money and our lives.”

At Shana’s workshop, she’ll open her financial tool box and share methods to help manage money effectively and dispassionately. Specific techniques will be offered that can be applied to any financial situation to relieve daily pressures.


large Portrait-Sept06 resized~001Shana Won is a Certified Financial Planner with Shuster Financial Group. Certified in Retirement Planning by the Wharton School, Shana also holds 2 bachelor’s degrees from UCLA. Actively involved in community and professional organizations, Shana is a member of the Women’s Leadership Council, the Million Dollar Roundtable, the IAFP, and is the Investment Committee Chair for the International Institute of Los Angeles. She sits on ISAAC’s Board of Directors as our Treasurer. For more information, please see

 ISAAC’s 5th Symposium: Healing of Memories, Healing of Finances will be held on October 5th at Evergreen Baptist Church, San Gabriel Valley.


Registration Now Available HERE.

Hee-Sun Cheon to Bring Collective Sculpting to ISAAC’s 5th Symposium

ISAAC’s 5th Symposium will feature Marriage and Family Therapy professor Hee-Sun Cheon and her interactive “sculpting” presentation. The sculpting exercise utilizes members of small groups as the “material” for sculpting expressions of collective and individual experience. This unique process integrates our minds, hearts and bodies in a shared encounter.

Each group member has the opportunity to be the “teller,” physically arranging group members in order to tell a story. The purpose being to “reflect their own wounds and healing experiences” and to allow the other participants to “listen and honor all the stories.”

In this practice of taking turns as teller, the group begins to develop collective images that include “any collective themes, images, ideas or values that stand out or seem to capture the essence or common experiences of the groups’ healing journey.” The process evolves  into a “live sculpture” that moves and shifts into new images.

Sculpting is a popular intervention used by family therapists as well as many therapists in other fields. Hee-Sun’s work in particular draws mainly from drama therapy.

Professor Cheon’s session will be the focus of the 5th Symposium’s afternoon session: The Healing of Memories.

HeeSunHee-Sun Cheon is a registered drama therapist and licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in WA. As a faculty member in the Masters’ program of Marriage and Family Therapy at Seattle Pacific University, Seattle, WA. Hee-Sun specializes in couples therapy, particularly in Emotionally Focused Therapy, supervision and training in MFT, mental health disparity issues for Asian Americans, and applications of drama therapy in the field of family therapy.

On Purposeful Forgetting

A response to  Miyoung Yoon Hammer’s “Psychological Homelessness: Healing Intergenerational Wounds” and Hsu Huan-Zung’s “In Karmic Tones.” Dr. Yoon Hammer’s article can be found in SANACS Journal #4

By Felix Huang

There was a time, on occasions when I returned to my hometown and stocked up on leafy greens at one of the Chinese supermarkets, or got my boba fix at one of the ubiquitous tea houses, I would feel the urge to scream, “People, there’s a whole world out there, beyond your nice little ‘#bobalife’ bubble, full of racial injustice and trauma and microaggressions and stereotype threat!”

Although I grew up in one of the Asian ethnoburbs of the San Gabriel Valley in LA, I attended a small, predominantly white college. There I experienced up-close systemic and institutional racism, alive and well even in an organization full of kind, well-meaning people. And as much of a bubble as the college is, it’s also in many ways a microcosm of wider American society. Thus since graduating from said college, my eyes have been shaped to identify the pervasiveness and effects of such systemic racism.

I never actually acted on my urge to scream at those in my hometown, and admittedly I knew not everybody’s story. But nonetheless, I felt a little like one returning to the cave in Plato’s allegory.


My family history is one of trauma. My maternal grandfather fled mainland China for Taiwan in 1949, but since he was not a Kuomintang member, he wasn’t taken care of by the KMT government as many other mainlanders in Taiwan (外省人) were. Most members of his family did not make it out of mainland China, and some, including his father, were imprisoned and tortured to death by the Communist government. Meanwhile my maternal grandmother, a benshengren (本省人 – Han people who were already in Taiwan prior to 1949), grew up with an abusive, alcoholic, and often absent father, and without her mother, who had passed away when my grandmother was quite young.

These stories were relayed to me at a young age. My immigrant mother made sure I knew where I came from, transmitting not only Chinese and Taiwanese history, culture, and language, but also our family history, including the sordid details.

My family is certainly not alone in having a traumatic history, but I found out that many of my peers were not told their stories of family trauma until they were much older, if at all. And they seemed to do just fine, or even better, without knowing.


Regarding the healing of intergenerational memories, Dr. Miyoung Yoon Hammer wants her children to “know who they are and where they come from… but… not be weighed down by the darkness of the painful memories that threaten to become their intergenerational family legacies” (SANACS 4, 73).

Meanwhile, Pete Hsu suggests “staying in relationship: conversing and sharing and being together, fighting and rejecting and breaking apart, understanding that something in us will hang on and heal and get back to the business to growing. And, as our stories entreat us, that though much is lost, much abides.”

Many times I feel paralyzed by my awareness of systemic racial injustice.

But for whatever reason, my awareness of my family history has not had the same debilitating effect.

I’m sure being here in the US and more than a step removed has something to do with it, whereas racial injustice is a close, everyday reality in America. The spatial distance from the family history has been beneficial in that I am deeply aware of it, but not formed so directly by the negative effects of it. The awareness of the stories has cultivated greater empathy for why my maternal grandparents live in fear and have tribalist tendencies, but I’ve avoided being negatively shaped by and prisoner to the effects of their story. I am neither ignorant of nor merely reactionary to their story, but rather there is a knowing accompanied by a sort of purposeful and dialectical forgetting.

I’m still trying to figure out how to apply that process to the trauma of being a person of color in a white supremacist society. But spending four months recently in Taipei, Taiwan has helped. In Taiwan, people no doubt have an awareness of being Taiwanese, but because the fabric of society is different, there is not nearly as much identity policing as in the States. As a Taiwanese American, I was subject to a little bit of the policing (you’re not acting Taiwanese enough), but also felt a sense of belonging, and was granted a respite from many of the specific issues I deal with in America. And I’ve come back as less of a reaction to the white supremacist structure, but no less aware of it.

Maybe there is a time to disengage, to no longer be in relationship, to “take a break.” And then maybe there is a time to come back to it.

We need to interact with our legacies. In order to converse and share, as Pete suggests, we need to have material to share and converse on. But we can also, where possible, take control of our legacies and actively write the next chapters, maybe even changing the story arc. And that might require some purposeful forgetting. There’s a difference between ignorance, never knowing in the first place, and purposefully forgetting, moving on.


Sometimes I still want to scream at my Asian American peers in the SGV, and other times I wonder if it’s better that (what I perceive to be) their blissful ethnobubbletea existence shouldn’t be shattered.

And sometimes I wonder whether learning about my family trauma at such a young age was more helpful or harmful.

When the Zimmerman verdict was declared, I ceased to wonder. This is why we need to know, because we East Asian Americans may have escaped some of the more obvious effects of injustice and trauma for now, but it sure as hell is affecting others.


UnknownFelix Huang is a contributing writer for Dime Magazine, a basketball lifestyle magazine. Check out his articles here, as well as his blog here.


Miyoung Yoon Hammer’s article, “Psychological Homelessness” can be found in SANACS Journal 4, 2012-2013.  Order your copy HERE.

The issue of “Healing of Memories” will comprise the afternoon session of ISAAC’s 5th Symposium, which will be held on October 5th at Evergreen Baptist Church SGV.


Registration Available HERE.