Tag Archives: Asian American Studies

CFP: AAPI Nexus: Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders Policy, Practice and Community

CALL FOR PAPERS: AAPI NEXUS SPECIAL ISSUE
ASIAN AMERICANS IN GLOBAL CITIES: LOS ANGELES-NEW YORK CONNECTIONS AND COMPARISONS

This special NEXUS issue seeks to uncover Asian American experiences in global cities by engaging in a comparative study of Los Angeles and New York.  The demographic facts are astonishing – over a quarter of the 15.7 million Asian Americans reside in either of the two greater metropolitan regions, where they comprise over a tenth of the total population in each metropolis. Drawn by potential opportunities, Asian Americans are integral to these global cities, contributing to the rich cultural, economic, social, and political landscape and serving as links to their home countries.  Within each region, Asian Americans have established vibrant urban neighborhoods and ethno-burbs that serve as a foundation for newer immigrant groups to pursue upward mobility for their families and future generations; mobilize to build a political voice; and create unique identities.

This LA-NY issue Call is for papers that use a comparative approach to generate exciting and significant new insights into transnationalism, migration studies, regional development, ethnic places, immigrant economies, political and civic engagement, and social movements occurring within these bi-coastal metropolitan areas.  Professor Tarry Hum, Queens College and Graduate Center, City University of New York and Professor Paul M. Ong, University of California, Los Angeles, will be the consulting Guest Editors working with the editorial staff on this volume. Our objective is to share information and insights to enhance the ability to take action in the areas of advocacy, strategic planning, policy development and programming. The following are examples of possible articles, although we are interested in other topics:

  • Asian-specific place-based social, political, and economic institutions and practices that sustain and build community.
  • What distinguishes Asian places and neighborhoods in Los Angeles and New York?
  • Are there internal and external structures and dynamics that transcend location?
  • How do similarities and differences in community formations relate to the Asian diaspora and racial/ethnic group dynamics?
  • Cultural productions and collective actions as a means to inform, mobilize, and build community and/or expose socioeconomic inequities for efforts to achieve parity.  How are Asian Americans working to build broader multi-racial coalitions?
  • How does global economic restructuring influence Asian American neighborhoods?

The publication will also contribute to Asian American Studies vis-a-vis theorizations of global cities and engaged practices.

We encourage paper submissions that provide perspectives of practitioners, academic researchers, and applied policy analysts.  To facilitate an active dialogue and exchange, we encourage co-authored papers ideally from LA and NY based authors, but will also accept single authored papers that focus on one or both regions.

If you are interested in submitting a manuscript, please send or email a Letter Of Intent with the title and a very short descriptive paragraph of the proposed paper to the editors for review. If you have a prepared paper, you may also submit the paper at the same time. For submission guidelines, please visit:
http://www.aasc.ucla.edu/aascpress/pressresources.asp and click on STYLE SHEET for Article Submissions (PDF Document).

AAPI Nexus is a peer-reviewed, national journal published by UCLA’s Asian American Studies Center focusing on policies, practices and community research to benefit the nation’s burgeoning Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. The journal’s mission is to facilitate an exchange of ideas and research findings that strengthens the efforts through policy and practice to tackle the pressing societal problems facing Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities. Since the inception of ethnic studies, the goal of “serving the community” has been at the heart of Asian American Studies and Pacific Islander Studies.

Previous issues have focused on Community Development, Civil Rights, and Voting. The table of contents and editors’ notes can be found at:

http://www.aasc.ucla.edu/aascpress/nexuscollection.asp

Deadline for Letter of Intent for LA-NY issue: December 15, 2010.

Deadline for Manuscript Submissions for LA-NY issue:  February 28, 2011.

Earlier submission of a Letter or Manuscript is encouraged. Internet communication is preferred. Please address to Managing Editor Melany Dela Cruz-Viesca and send to AAPI Nexus Journal at:

Melany Dela Cruz -Viesca [Email]

and send an electronic copy to:

Senior Editor Marjorie Kagawa-Singer
Guest Editor Professor Paul Ong
Guest Editor Professor Tarry Hum
Co-Managing Editor Christina Aujean Lee

For regular mail, send all correspondence to:

Christina Aujean Lee, Managing Editor
AAPI Nexus Journal
UCLA Asian American Studies Center
3230 Campbell Hall
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1546

* * * * *
David K. Yoo, Ph.D. [Email]
Director & Professor
Asian American Studies Center & Department
University of California, Los Angeles
310.825.2974 (Center)
310.206.5592 (Department)
www.aasc.ucla.edu
www.asianam.ucla.edu

Advertisements

Hmong Studies Postdoctoral Fellowship – University of Minnesota

PLEASE CIRCULATE WIDELY

The Program in Asian American Studies and the Institute for Advanced Study at the University of Minnesota are pleased to announce a new 2009-2010 Postdoctoral Fellowship in any field of Hmong Studies, generously funded by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

Applicants should conduct research germane to Hmong Studies. Proposed research projects should have the potential to make a significant contribution to the field.

During their stay at the University of Minnesota, postdoctoral fellows will be expected to participate in research, teaching, and service. While research is the primary responsibility, fellows will be expected to teach one course related to their research interests and consonant with the curricular needs of the Asian American Studies program. In addition, fellows are expected to give one talk on campus on their research project.

The stipend for 2009-2010 year will be $45,000, with full fringe benefits. The program will provide the fellow with office space and routine office support for photocopying, faxing, mailing, etc.

A doctoral degree in hand is required by August 31, 2009. Preference will be given to applicants who have completed their degrees in the past five years. The postdoctoral fellowship will begin on August 31, 2009, is for one year, and is non-renewable.

Applications should be completed on-line at the UMN jobsite http://employment.umn.edu/ (search for requisition # 160379).

To guarantee full consideration, application materials should be submitted to the Institute for Advanced Study by April 15, 2009.

If you have any questions, please contact Ann Waltner (Email Ann Waltner) or Erika Lee (Email Dr. Lee).

_____________________

Erika Lee, Director
Asian American Studies Program
Associate Professor Department of History and Asian American Studies
University of Minnesota
1012 Heller Hall
271 -19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455
work: 612/624-9569
fax: 612/624-7096

Call for Papers: 2008 East of California Conference (Connecticut)

2008 East of California Conference:  A Movement to Look Back To
October 31, 2008 – November 1, 2008
The University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut

ABSTRACTS DUE: Monday, June 30, 2008

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

•    Transnationalism & Cosmopolitanism
•    Demographic Shifts
•    Border studies
•    Cross-ethnic/racial collaborations and coalitions
•    Multi-disciplinary/inter-disciplinary collaborations and coalitions
•    Scholar-activist work, within and outside the academy
•    Civil Liberties and Civil Rights, before and after 9/11
•    Teaching in the 21st century
•    The state of “Asian America”
•    Asian American methodologies and epistemologies
•    Asian American visual cultures
•    The Asian American archive: what is it and where is it?

Requirements for Submission:

•    Roundtable: 1 page curriculum vitae; 1 page outline for 5-7 minute remarks
•    Panel:  1 page curriculum vitae per participant; 1 page panel abstract (500 words)
•    Individual paper:  1 page curriculum vitae; 1 page panel abstract (250 words)

Please send electronic copies of all materials to both Cathy Schlund-Vials (schlundvials@gmail.com) and Jennifer Ho (hojennifer@earthlink.net) by June 30, 2008.

* * *

In 1993, the East of California Conference was hosted by the recently formed Asian American Studies Institute at the University of Connecticut. Fifteen years later, the EOC conference returns to UConn. As the Asian American Studies Institute celebrates its fifteenth anniversary, the field of Asian American Studies also celebrates a significant moment in 2008. The title for this year’s conference, “A Movement to Look Back To,” signals the fortieth anniversary of the San Francisco State strike, which facilitated the emergence of Ethnic Studies and Asian American Studies on the higher education landscape. The nature and tenor of Asian American Studies has altered dramatically, and the field is increasingly marked by multidisciplinary methodologies and interdisciplinary collaborations between Ethnic Studies programs and departments.
Mindful that Asian American Studies emerged out of an atmosphere of social justice and founded on both theory and practice, the conference organizers encourage individual papers, panel submissions and roundtable proposals that acknowledge the extent to which the field continues to grow and expand, both within and outside the institution of the academy and particularly East of California. Concomitantly, given the variegated nature of Asian American Studies, the conference organizers welcome proposals that actively engage contemporary considerations of Asian American cultural production, identity formation, aesthetics, and politics. The conference will be hosted by the Asian American Studies Institute at the University of Connecticut, Storrs, and will take place October 31 – November 1, 2008.

cfp: 2008 East of California Asian American Studies Conference (Storrs, CT)

The Call for Papers for the 2008 East of California Conference has been extended to Monday, June 30, 2008. Please do consider sending in an abstract–if you have any questions, feel free to contact one of the EOC co-chairs (contact information listed below in the CFP).

========================

2008 East of California Conference: A Movement to Look Back To
October 31, 2008 – November 1, 2008
The University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut

ABSTRACTS DUE: Monday, June 30, 2008

Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

• Transnationalism & Cosmopolitanism
• Demographic Shifts
• Border studies
• Cross-ethnic/racial collaborations and coalitions
• Multi-disciplinary/inter-disciplinary collaborations and coalitions
• Scholar-activist work, within and outside the academy
• Civil Liberties and Civil Rights, before and after 9/11
• Teaching in the 21st century
• The state of “Asian America”
• Asian American methodologies and epistemologies
• Asian American visual cultures
• The Asian American archive: what is it and where is it?

Requirements for Submission:

• Roundtable: 1 page curriculum vitae; 1 page outline for 5-7 minute remarks
• Panel: 1 page curriculum vitae per participant; 1 page panel abstract (500 words)
• Individual paper: 1 page curriculum vitae; 1 page panel abstract (250 words)

Please send electronic copies of all materials to both Cathy Schlund-Vials (schlundvials@gmail.com) and Jennifer Ho (hojennifer@earthlink.net) by June 30, 2008.